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Redesigning an Organizational Behavior

Posted by UWSPcps - March 1, 2013 - Academics, Business & Economics, Faculty & Staff, Featured

Prof. C.R. Marshall, UW-Stevens Point School of Business & Economics

Prof. C.R. Marshall, UW-Stevens Point School of Business & Economics

Two faculty members from the UW-Stevens Point School of Business & Economics were honored for their paper at the 49th annual Midwest Business Administration Association (MBAA) International Convention, on Friday, March 1 at the Drake Hotel in Chicago.

C.R. Marshall and Lyna Matesi won the North American Management Society’s Distinguished Paper Award at the convention for their article “Redesigning an Organizational Behavior Class Using the Understanding by Design framework.”

Abstract: If our job as university professors is to guide our students in their learning process, then we must carefully consider what learning we should guide them toward. This paper describes the backwards design process, based on Wigging and McTighe (2006) that the authors used to meld student opinion with their own academic and professional experience to develop learning outcomes for an undergraduate course in Organizational Behavior.

The 2011 and 2012 UW-Stevens Point curriculum development workshops lead by Paula DeHart from the School of Educaiton were an important part of developing the article.

Since its first meeting in 1965, the MBAA International has acted as a coordinating body for autonomous groups in a variety of business-related academic areas. Eleven formal tracks with over 800 active members make up the MBAA International. These organizations represent a variety of disciplines, including accounting, economics, finance, health administration,  information systems, business society and government, international business, legal studies, management, marketing, operations management and entrepreneurship and case studies.

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